Unit Level Data

Student Cohort data

This information provides you with more detail about your student cohort. Most MMU unit leaders are very accustomed to working effectively with diverse groups of students. This data will indicate any significant shift from one year to another, or between programmes in the same faculty which may make you think about the way you organise the unit.

For instance, is there anything the team can do to support integration across a diverse student group, such as structured small group activities?  If a large number of your students live at home, could you provide timetabled opportunities for groupwork during the day, as it may be difficult for them to organise informally? Is the size of a group such that you need to design in more structured opportunities for interaction? Do lectures need to be adapted to accommodate specific disabilities? If numbers are generally increasing, is this having an impact on teaching space and other resources? Is this a trend likely to continue, and if so, how will you continue to provide appropriate student support?

It’s worth having a look at how many students on this unit are repeating the year (with or without attendance)? Do they need particular support?

More general suggestions about this topic in relation to the whole programme can be found in the section about Programme-level data: Students.

Progression

How many students passed this unit at the first attempt at the most recent board of assessment? You probably already know this figure, but it is useful to see it in comparison to other units on the programme and compared with the previous year.

If the data shows a higher than average number, could you consider what it is that you’re doing which might be good practice which could be shared with colleagues? Don’t feel shy about contacting your  UTA faculty link to discuss ways we could do this – we know that people really value finding out what colleagues have done via our Good Practice Exchange.

If you have concerns about the number of students who passed the unit at the first attempt, you could think about trying a few things.

The Step-up to Success Scheme has trialled inexpensive approaches to supporting assessment: working with Associate Lecturers to do additional formative marking, and the use of Peer-Assisted Learning leaders to support group study sessions outside the usual timetabled sessions. Would some additional resource of this kind help students on your unit to prepare more effectively for their assessments? Contact your UTA faculty link for more information and to discuss the options for your unit.

More general suggestions about progression in relation to the whole programme can be found in the section about Programme-level data: Progression.

Marks

Look at the average marks for the unit in the context of the same data for this unit in previous years and for similar units. This will give you a sense of where this unit sits. Is it what you would expect? Do you have a particular range of marks which you think is acceptable for this unit?

This data is most useful when used in discussion with colleagues teaching other units on a programme. See our general suggestions about this in the section about Programme-level data: Marks.

Satisfaction

Because modules are usually taught and managed by individuals or very small teams, people may feel very sensitive about the results of student satisfaction evaluations.  You may find it useful to look at our guidance on responding to evaluation before reading further.

The Internal Student Survey (ISS), is carried out biannually and asks students questions about their units and their programmes. It can provide useful indicators of areas for development and of good practice, but should never be considered in isolation, and needs to be used in conjunction with the other data, as well as with other sources of student feedback.

Have there been any changes since last year? If so, what might be the reasons?

It’s useful to see where your unit sits compared to others. Is it what you would expect? If your unit is much higher or lower than you might expect, what might be the reasons? Are you doing something different?

The comments may explain some of the reasons for any change in student satisfaction. Are the same kinds of comments being repeated regularly? Is one particular aspect of the unit singled out for comment, such as a type of tutorial, the lectures, or the assignment brief?

If the comments focus on a part of the unit taught by one particular member of staff (and even if it’s you), then think about how this can be addressed. Do you need to make a professional development plan for the unit team? You can contact your  CELT faculty link to discuss options in confidence.

Could you share any innovative examples of your teaching which have had a positive effect on student satisfaction? Don’t feel shy about contacting your  CELT faculty link to discuss ways we could do this – we know that people really value finding out what colleagues have done via our Good Practice Exchange.

This data is most useful when used in discussion with colleagues teaching other units on a programme. See our general suggestions about this in the section about Programme-level data: Satisfaction.